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Smoking And Social Awareness Essay Help


Why You Must Stop Smoking Immediately:

Every cigarette will approximately reduce your life span  by 10 minutes Smoking cause heart problem & increase the coronary artery disease Smoking end up with painful death due to lung cancer Nicotine is stimulant & you get addicted to it if you smoke
Smoking during pregnancy cause your child death

Most people know that smoking can cause lung cancer, but it can also cause many other cancers and illnesses. The effects of smoking on human health are serious and in many cases, deadly. There are approximately 4000 chemicals in cigarettes, hundreds of which are toxic. The ingredients in cigarettes affect everything from the internal functioning of organs to the efficiency of the body's immune system. The effects of cigarette smoking are destructive and widespread.

Effects of Smoking

• Smoking raises blood pressure, which can cause hypertension (high blood pressure) - a risk factor for heart attacks and stroke.

• Couples who smoke are more likely to have fertility problems than couples who are non-smokers.

• Smoking worsens asthma and counteracts asthma medication by worsening the inflammation of the airways that the medicine tries to ease.

• The blood vessels in the eye are sensitive and can be easily damaged by smoke, causing a bloodshot appearance and itchiness.

• Heavy smokers are twice as likely to get macular degeneration, resulting in the gradual loss of eyesight.

• Smokers run an increased risk of cataracts.

• Smokers take 25 per cent sicker day’s year than non-smokers.

• Smoking stains your teeth and gums.

• Smoking increases your risk of periodontal disease, which causes swollen gums, bad breath and teeth to fall out.

• Smoking causes an acid taste in the mouth and contributes to the development of ulcers.

• Smoking also affects your looks: smokers have paler skin and more wrinkles. This is because smoking reduces the blood supply to the skin and lowers levels of vitamin A.

Do your very best to stay away from cigarettes as much as possible, After dinner, instead of a cigarette, treat yourself to a cup of mint tea or a peppermint candy. Have a healthy life.


600,000 Passive Smokers Are killed Every Year

It is very ironic to see the facts that passive smokers also inhale and gets the negative effects of cigarette smoke from smokers. According to WHO, there are about 600,000 passive smokers who die each year.

World Health Organization (WHO) declared that a passive smoker contributes 1 percent of total global deaths worldwide. This numberpassive smokers who die each year due to smoking habits of others. means that there are about 600,000

In the first study to assess the global impact of passive smoking, WHO expert team found that the most victims who are exposed to secondary cigarette smoke are children, and approximately 165,000 children die each year because of cigarette smoke.

Exposures to secondary smoke at home were the most. And infectious diseases and the effects of tobacco seem to be a deadly combination for children.

Deaths due to secondary smoke on children tend to occur in many poor and middle countries, while mortality in adults scattered in countries with all levels of income.

This exposure is estimated to have caused 379,000 deaths from heart disease, 165,000 due to respiratory infections, 36,900 for asthma, and 21,400 for lung cancer. Passive smoke has been implicated in: Increased, exacerbated episodes of asthma and respiratory illnesses among children; respiratory illness and distress; asthmatic and allergic responses; and cardiovascular damage among adults.

“Policy makers in each country should remember that enforcing smoke-free law will substantially reduce the number of deaths caused by exposure to secondary cigarette smoke in the first year of implementation, accompanied by the reduction in the cost of disease treatment in health and social systems,”

Passive smokers usually inhale smoke from burning cigarettes and the smoke released by an active smoker. Being a passive smoker actually has made someone become a smoker too. Usually these passive smokers smoke at home, cars, workplaces and other public places like bars.

To see how many passive smokers are exposed to smoke can be tested by measuring levels of nicotine, cotinine and carbon monoxide in the blood, saliva or urine. Cotinine is a result of metabolic product of nicotine in the body.



Smoking Injurious for Children

Many smokers are of the view that smoking is only limited to them. They are at fault and forget that every other person within their family, their house and their society is getting infected with this smoke. The impacts of the cigarette and smoking are not just related to the people, the outer environment is also getting affected with this dreadful thing. This reason is enough to inform any smoker as why quit smoking is essential for everyone besides this own self.

Children are at much harm as far as the smoking is concerned. The phenomena of second hand smoking are better to discuss. When anyone within family smokes, they are infecting their kids with the smoke. The immunity systems of the kids are not well developed and organized. They easily fall victim to the harmful effects of cigarette and smoking.

Many diseases can originate and start among kids due to smoking, however many crucial and harmful problems are respiratory problems, cardiovascular infections and ear problems.

Cigarette contains around 4000 harmful chemicals and all such chemicals are like poisonous for kids. Nicotine, carbon monoxide, tar and carcinogen are the few names in this category. Carbon monoxide is so dangerous that it even replaces the oxygen from the blood stream and reaches all other body parts thus leading to the deficiency of oxygen. It eventually becomes the start of the main problem among many children. Cardiovascular problem arises when heart finds it hard to compensate for the loss of oxygen. It starts to pump hard and thus puts more pressure. Heart attack and many other heart problems start right from this point.

Nicotine is the main substance which causes an addiction to smoking habit. Besides addiction, it also changes mood of a person, thus when a child starts smoking, he is inviting many lungs and stomach problem inside him. Such child may also get addicted to the other forms of drugs like heroin and cocaine.

Many respiratory problems are also one of the causes of smoking. When smoke enters the body of any child, it goes into the lungs and thus destroys them. Bronchi and the air sacs are the main areas which are responsible for the inhalation and exhalation of the fresh air. When smoke surrounds lungs, it becomes difficult for the air sacs to work properly. Lungs don’t get enough space to expand fully. This way many lungs and respiratory problems are raised.

Many forms of cancers are also linked with the smoking. Tobacco causes mouth to go dry and thus leads to mouth cancer. It can also lead to throat, oesophagus, stomach and intestinal problems. All problem start from the mouth cavity.

The impacts of the second hand smoking are more on kids. According to the study, 85 percent of the kids fall victim to the second hand smoking and thus develop ear infection.

Children must be kept away from the direct as well as indirect effects of smoking.


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