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Cv Template First Part-Time Job Cover Letter

by Michael Cheary

Struggling to find your perfect part-time position?

Chances are, it could come down to your cover letter. Especially if you’re guilty of sending the same one every time (or worse, not even sending one at all).

Think of it this way: a cover letter is often the first thing a hiring manager looks at, meaning it can be crucial in forming a positive first impression. So spending a few more minutes perfecting this oft-forgotten area of your application can really pay dividends when it comes to your career.

We’ve already covered how to perfect your part-time CV, but to help maximise your chances to impress, here’s our cover letter template specifically tailored for part-time positions:

 

Download Part-Time Cover Letter Template

 

Opening the letter

Aside from the standard letter writing basics (address, hiring manager’s name if you have it), the opening paragraph should be short and to the point.

Explain what job it is you’re applying for, and where you found the vacancy. One or two sentences, maximum.

 
Example:
I wish to apply for the role of Part-Time EA, currently being advertised on reed.co.uk. Please find enclosed my CV for your consideration.

 

Second paragraph – Why are you suitable for the job?

Now the formalities are out of the way, it’s time to focus on your sales pitch.

Briefly outline any academic qualifications or experience you have which make you a perfect fit for the role. If you’re lacking experience, select soft skills which might help you get the role.

Hint: the ones you should include will always be found in the job description.

 
Example:
As you can see from my attached CV, I have over six years’ experience in office administration, and I believe the knowledge and skills built up during this time make me the perfect candidate for the role.

Third paragraph – Focus on the part-time requirements

You might choose your cover letter to briefly explain the reason you’re looking for part-time work.

It could be that you’re still studying, and looking for something flexible to fit around your schedule. Or you’re raising a family and can’t dedicate yourself to a role full-time.

However, whatever the reason you choose to include, always take the opportunity to mention your versatility when it comes to working hours. It might help alleviate any fears an employer may have around your availability, not to mention open up the potential at securing a full-time role – if that’s something you’re interested in.

Just remember that you’re under no obligation to explain yourself, if it’s something you’re not quite comfortable with. You won’t necessarily lose marks for being vague.

 
Example:
I’m currently studying for my EA Diploma, and looking for a position which will enable me to dedicate more time to my course whilst I build my skills. However, I am extremely flexible, and happy to take on more work outside my contracted hours, wherever possible.

 

Fourth/Fifth paragraph – What can you do for the company?

Use actual, quantifiable examples to emphasise what you can do for the company.

These might be performance based, and could include examples from previous positions, your current job, or even from your academic career.

Always make sure you choose tangible examples that are specifically tailored to the role. Backing up your claims, such as ‘Increased revenue by x%’, will be far more desirable to a recruiter than simply stating you ‘Increased revenue’.

Other examples include ‘Improved productivity by X%, ‘an increase in students grades by x’ and ‘achieved a first class distinction grade in my dissertation on x’.

 
Example:
In my previous role as a full-time Office Administrator at Company Ltd, I was responsible for the reorganisation and recategorisation of the office filing system, as well as implementing a change in stationery supplier – which reduced costs in this area by over 20%.

Additionally, part of my role involved diary management for the company’s Managing Director, as well as typing up correspondence and meeting minutes, where appropriate.

 

Final paragraph – Reiterate

Finish off by reiterating your interest in the role, and why you’re the right person for a position.

Extra points will be given to any nod you can give when it comes to your research.

 
Example:
I am confident that this experience, coupled with the modules I’m currently undertaking as part of my Diploma (including budgeting, business document production and event management), will have an immediate impact on the business and allow me to help Company Ltd build upon their reputation as the biggest supplier of paper and packaging solutions in the UK.

 

Closing the letter

Finally, sign off your cover letter by thanking the recruiter for their time. It is also a good opportunity to indicate you’d like to meet with the employer for an interview.

Use ‘Yours Sincerely’ (if you know the name of the hiring manager)/’Yours Faithfully’ (if you do not), and your name.

Also, use this opportunity to include your contact details – just in case your cover letter ends up getting separated from the rest of your CV

 
Example:
Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to meeting with you to discuss my application further.

Yours sincerely,

[Your name]

[Your contact details]

 

Final thoughts

Remember: This template is intended to be a guideline. Don’t be tempted to use it as a ready-made cover letter.

Without the proper research into the company, and without tailoring it to the role, it will lack the impact that could make all the difference when it comes to securing your perfect part-time position.

 

Still searching for your perfect position? Have a look at all of our current vacancies now.

 

Sections:

Write Your Resume

A resume and cover letter are your tools to make an impact on a potential employer and secure an interview. There are literally hundreds of books on the market with good advice about how to write effective resumes and cover letters, each with a different opinion on style and content. The USC Career Center believes that writing a quality resume and cover letter for internship and full-time job opportunities begins with a targeted, one-page summary of your skills and experiences that convinces the employer you would be successful in that position. The goal is to make your materials so engaging that the reader cannot wait to meet you.

To view the Career Center’s Guide to Effective Resumes, Cover Letters and LinkedIn Profiles, log onto your connectSC account. You will find it under the Resources tab.

Resume Format

The most acceptable and readily used format for college students is the chronological resume, in which your most recent experience is listed first. How you choose to construct your resume, in terms of style, is up to you. For example, placing dates on the left or right or whether your contact information should be centered or on the left hand column is entirely your choice. The one rule to remember is that consistency is the name of the game. Always maintain the same style throughout your resume.

  • Contact Information: Put your contact information at the top of your resume. It should include your name, address, phone number, and email address. If you plan to relocate soon it is acceptable to list a permanent address.
  • Objective: For most college students seeking internships or entering the professional job market, stating an objective on your resume is not necessary. Instead, bring out your interests in a cover letter that is customized for the specific job to which you are applying.
  • Education: List your degrees in reverse chronological order, with the most recent degree first as well as any study abroad experiences you may have. You may also include relevant coursework to highlight specific skills and knowledge. If your GPA is 3.0 or above, go ahead and list it in this section.
  • Experience: List your most recent experience first and do not overlook internships, volunteer positions, and part-time employment. Use action verbs to highlight accomplishments and skills.
  • Academic Projects: If you have specific academic projects that qualify you for the position, include them in their own section with detail on what you accomplished through the project that the person reading your resume should know.
  • Additional Information: This section may stand alone under the “Additional Information” heading and highlight relevant information that may include computer and language skills, professional associations, university and community activities (including any offices held), and interests.
  • Other Headings: Choosing to break out information such as interests and professional associations as separate headings is acceptable if relevant to the position.  Sharing personal information (i.e. birthday) or attaching a headshot is not acceptable unless relevant to the position.
  • References: Do not list your references on your resume. A prepared list of 2-4 references should be printed on a separate sheet of paper that matches your resume format. Bring a hard copy (or multiple copies, if needed) of your resume and references with you to the interview.
International students: when applying to positions within the U.S., one-page resumes are standard practice. In the U.S., a curriculum vitae (CV) refers to a summary of qualifications and education that is usually more than one page and is used when applying to academic/faculty or research-related positions. Employers prefer resume formats which are minimal and easy-to-read. Personal information like birthdate are omitted to protect candidates from job discrimination as prohibited by federal laws.

Resume guidelines that differ from non-U.S. resumes/CVs:

  • Avoid colorful fonts or use of tables
  • Minimal personal info (no birthdate, picture, height, country of origin)
  • Omit pronouns
  • Include industry terms when appropriate
  • Share only relevant information (be able to justify content to an employer)

My Resume Checklist

  • No spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors
  • Makes clear, concise, and positive impression in 30 seconds or less
  • One page (more if writing a curriculum vitae/CV for an academic or research position)
  • Organized, easy to read, and has balance between content and white space
  • Uses standard fonts including Times New Roman, Arial, Century, Helvetica, or Verdana in sizes 10, 11 or 12; do not use a font size smaller than size 10.
  • Highlights skills and accomplishments that match key words found in the job description
  • Quantifies accomplishments, if possible (e.g., how much $ raised, # of people served and % of time saved)
  • Utilizes accomplishment statements
    • Action verb stating what you did
    • How you did it
    • Result (quantify when possible)
  • Cites relevant publications and presentations using the bibliographic style of your field
  • NO GENERIC RESUMES!

Samples

 

If your school (Marshall, Annenberg, Viterbi) has a career center, please check their website for potential industry-specific resumes.

Create Your Cover Letter

Your resume is your marketing brochure. Your cover letter is your introduction or ‘executive summary’ to your resume. The main point of a cover letter is to tie your experience directly to the job description. Look at the description and be sure the words relate directly to those in your cover letter and resume. If the employer is looking for teamwork, highlight a team experience in your resume and be sure to include a team-related accomplishment in your cover letter. Your cover letter should be:

  • Concise: Your cover letter should be three to four paragraphs. Any longer might lose the interest of the reader. We suggest the following format:
    • Opening paragraph: Four or five sentences maximum. Mention the position you are applying to/interested in, briefly introduce yourself, and indicate where you learned of the opportunity.
    • Body of letter: Usually one or two paragraphs. Share detailed examples of your qualifications for the position’s specific requirements. Many students choose to use one paragraph to discuss previous work experiences and another one to discuss academic experiences or leadership experience, etc. Choose whatever combination communicates your most relevant qualifications most effectively.
    • Closing: Three to four sentences maximum. Summarize your qualifications, restate your enthusiasm for the position, and include your preferred contact information for the employer to follow-up with you.
  • Clear: Articulate your qualifications in words that mirror what the employer provided in the job description. Do not try to impress with a long list of accomplishments. This is the executive summary, not the resume.
  • Convincing: An employer will make a decision on your candidacy based on the combined letter and resume package. You have to articulate the connection to the job description and sell your skills. This is a competition. Why should the employer hire you?

My Cover Letter Checklist

  • The words and action verbs in your cover letter should be reflective of the job description.
  • Always be professional.
  • Use proper grammar.
  • Check for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Know to whom the resume/cover letter package is going. Call the organization to see if they can provide you the correct name and title of the person to whom you should be addressing the letter. Do not use “To Whom It May Concern.” If no name is available, address letter to the Recruiter or Hiring Manager.
  • Use paragraph form, not bullet points.
  • Do not copy and paste content directly from your resume to your cover letter.
  • Do not be forward in requesting an interview.
  • Keep to one page (no more than 3-4 paragraphs).
  • When emailing a recruiter or hiring manager directly, use the body of the email to write two to three sentences that introduce yourself and mention to what position you are applying. Include your cover letter and resume as attachments. Do not cut and paste your cover letter into the body of the email.
  • Submit cover letter in PDF format.

Know When to Use a Curriculum Vitae (CV)

If you are considering positions in academia (teaching and research), you are generally asked to provide a curriculum vitae (CV) in lieu of a resume.

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